DePaul University Global Engagement > Student Resources > Study Abroad > For Students > Diverse Student Resources

Diverse Student Resources

Studying abroad is frequently cited as a milestone in a student’s personal development. Having the opportunity to explore different cultures not only teaches you about them, but also your own. Explore the resources below for specific student populations to learn more.

First Generation Students Abroad

First generation students are the first in their family to attend a college or university. First generation students may face a distinct set of challenges when it comes to studying abroad, but you should not view those challenges as a reason not to go abroad!

Study Abroad has compiled information regarding the selection of programs, questions to ask yourself, and additional resources including on-campus, off-campus,and financial aid.

Selecting a Program

Research your host country and any other countries you may visit! The belief systems and values held there may differ heavily from your own or they may be more closely aligned than you previously thought. The more you know, the better you will be equipped to navigate new and challenging experiences. As a first generation student, there are personal considerations you must make while planning your future study abroad endeavor.

Consider how you will explain the process and interest in studying abroad to your family or friends.
  • How can I explain to my family that a study abroad experience can contribute to achievement of my academic and career goals?
  • How can I let my family know that it is safe to travel abroad?
Consider what resources are available to you and your family.
  • Since no one in my family has ever studied abroad, who can help me check to see that I am on the right track as I plan?
  • Is it okay if I schedule an extra appointment with my study abroad advisor if I'm not sure what to do?
  • Is it okay for my parent or guardian to meet with the advisor as well?
  • Are there additional funding sources I can look into to help finance study abroad?

Financing a Program

If you are intending on enrolling in a DePaul sponsored program, all of the financial aid and scholarships you currently receive will remain in place. Additionally, there are DePaul-sponsored scholarships. If you decide to go on a study abroad program through an outside service provider or university, you can still receive federal aid but will need to apply to external scholarships.

There are two scholarships specifically for first generation students participating in DePaul programs including:

Advisors

If you are interested in studying abroad for a quarter or longer, contact the advi​sor​ in your geographic region of interest. For short-term programs over breaks, visit the website for the program you are interested in for their contact information.

Regardless of the program, any advisor will be happy to meet with you to discuss any uncertainties or answer any questions you may have.

Resources

On-campus:
Please reach out to the Study Abroad office to discuss any questions or concerns you may have regarding studying abroad. We may also be able to connect you with previous study abroad participants to discuss the specifics of the program you are interested in.

Additional:
  • AllAbroad.us is a great resource for funding advice, outreach materials and study abroad advice specifically written with first-generation students in mind.
  • Diversity Abroad provides tips for first generations students on how to best prepare for studying abroad; this includes advice, scholarship information, student testimonials and more.
  • First Generation Student is a great website for first generation students in general, but they also feature student testimonials from study abroad programs.
  • Global Scholars offers online modules for study abroad courses—pre-departure, while abroad and return.

First-Year Students Abroad

Start down the path to global citizenship early! FY@broad programs are designed for first-year students and combine travel with Focal Point Seminars, a required course in your first year.
 
Study Abroad has compiled information regarding the selection of programs, questions to ask yourself, and additional resources including on-campus, off-campus, and financial resources.

Selecting a Program

Which FY@broad programs are being offered? Besides FY@broad, where in the world can I go?
We have over 40 destination countries and 70 programs for you to choose from. You can go anywhere from Shanghai to London!

Will I get behind my studies if I go abroad?
Once accepted to a program, you will work with your academic advisor and study abroad advisor to ensure the courses you enroll in abroad will assist in your degree progress.

How will this actually help me?
According to a 2012 survey conducted by IES Abroad, 95 percent of students who studied abroad found jobs within a year of graduation, compared to 49 percent of the general population.

Financing a Program

If you are intending on enrolling in a DePaul-sponsored program, all of the financial aid and scholarships you currently receive will remain in place. Additionally, there are DePaul-sponsored scholarships. If you decide to go on a study abroad program through an outside service provider or university, you can still receive federal aid but would need to apply to external scholarships.

Study Abroad awards the following competitive scholarships to students participating in DePaul FY@broad programs. Award criteria include financial need (as determined by the Financial Aid office) and a student essay. 
  • FY@broad Students of Color Scholarships
  • FY@broad First Generation Student Scholarships
  • FY@broad Need-based Scholarships

Advisors

If you are interested in studying abroad for a quarter or longer, contact the advisor in your geographic region of interest.  For short-term programs over breaks, see the website for the program you are interested to find the contact information for the study abroad advisor.

Regardless of the program, any advisor would be happy to meet with you to discuss any uncertainties or answer any questions you may have.

Resources

  • Study Abroad 101 sessi​ons are held every day during the academic year in either Lincoln Park or the Loop by our peer advisors. During the presentation, they will detail how to select a program that’s just right for you, the application process, how to finance your program and which advisor would be the best for you to contact.
  • Global Scholars offers online modules for study abroad courses—pre-departure, while abroad and return.

LGBTQA Students Abroad

Whether you already identify as a lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans*, queer or asexual student or are still exploring your own sexual and gender identities, Study Abroad seeks to provide the most beneficial programs and resources for you. 

In collaboration with LGBTQA Stu​dent Services, Study Abroad has compiled information regarding the selection of programs, questions to ask yourself, and additional resources including on-campus, off-campus and financial resources.

Selecting a Program

Research your host country and any other countries you may visit! The belief systems and values held there may differ heavily from your own or they may be more closely aligned than you previously thought. As a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning individual, there are social, political, legal, medical and personal considerations you must make while planning your future study abroad endeavor.
 
Consider your own identity. Establish what is important and necessary for you and determine how you would navigate new situations.
  • Am I currently out or open about my sexuality or gender identity in my home country?
  • How open am I going to be with my sexuality or gender identity with my peers, roommates, homestay family, professors, etc. while abroad?
  • If I am not out or open about my sexuality or gender identity in my home country but plan on coming out while abroad, will there be resources or support I can access?
  • Some countries are more progressive in their beliefs regarding sexuality and gender identity than others (even my home country), is my host country like this?
  • In general, are there safety considerations that I should be aware of?
  • How important is it for me to find other LGBTQ identified individuals?
  • Will I need access to certain medications or services while abroad?  If so, will I need to provide further documentation to ensure I receive them?
  • Are there any LGBTQ resources nearby? How can I find and access them?
Consider the host country’s social and political climate regarding sexual and gender identity.
  • What are the cultural and local attitudes in my host country towards people of my nationality, tourists, sexual orientation and gender identity? What is the attitude of local residents toward LGBTQ individuals?
  • What is the social perception of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning people in my host country? How are LGBTQ individuals socially defined? What roles do LGBTQ people play in the host culture?
  • What are gender relations in the host culture? What is considered typical male and female social behavior in the host culture? Does the host country operate within a strict binary?
  • Is the country I am staying in more progressive than my home country regarding issues of sexuality and gender?
  • What is the current government’s view on LGBTQ rights? What about the past governments?
  • Are there any conflicts going on within the host country that LGBTQ citizens and visitors should be especially aware of? If so, what is the government/police’s role in the conflict?
Consider the host country’s access to certain medications and services.
  • Will I have access to the medications and supplies I currently take or use in my host country?
  • Do I need additional documentation to ensure I can receive the medication, supplies and services I require?
  • Are there any physicians I can see while abroad? How will I find them?
Consider the host country’s laws regarding sexual and gender expression.
  • What is the police attitude towards LGBTQ individuals (both local residents and visitors)?
  • Are there “public decency” laws? Or sodomy laws? Are they different depending on gender?
  • Are there any gender-specific laws?
  • What is the age of consent? Does it differ for heterosexual versus same-sex couples?
  • Does the law require having “proper documentation” at all times?

Financing a Program

If you are intending on enrolling in a DePaul-sponsored program, all of the financial aid and scholarships you currently receive will remain in place. Additionally, there are DePaul-sponsore​d scholarships. If you decide to go on a program through an outside service provider or university, you can still receive federal aid but would need to apply to external scholarships.

Fund for Education Abroad (F​EA) offers a Rainbow scholarship for LGBTQIA students participating in study abroad programs.

Advisors

If you are interested in studying abroad for a quarter or longer, contact the ad​visor in your geographic region of interest. For short-term programs over breaks, visit the website for the program you are interested in for their contact information.

Regardless of the program, any advisor will be happy to meet with you to discuss any uncertainties or answer any questions you may have.

Resources

On-campus: Additional:

Students of Color

Students of color and students from underrepresented ethnic and religious groups successfully study abroad every quarter here at DePaul.  In terms of the issue of race, some students feel that they are effected different while they are abroad than they are here in America, while some feel that the experience is quite similar to their lives here in America.

In collaboration with the Office of Multicultural Student Success (OMSS), Study Abroad has compiled information regarding the selection of programs, questions to ask yourself and additional resources including on-campus, off-campus and financial resources.  Contact our office if you would like to talk to a student of color who has participated in study abroad.

Selecting a Program

Research your host country and any other countries you may visit! The belief systems and values held there may differ heavily from your own or they may be more closely aligned than you previously thought. As a student of color, there are social, political and personal considerations you must make while planning your future study abroad endeavor.

Consider your own race and cultural background. Establish what is important and necessary for you and determine how you would navigate new situations.
  • What is the racial make-up of my host country/city/university?
  • What expectations do I have of the experience?
  • Is there any local community that shares my heritage—and what are my feelings about having or not having such a community available to me?
  • Some countries are more progressive in their beliefs regarding race than others (even my home country), is my host country like this?
  • In some countries, discrimination may be more overt than it would be in other places, is my host country like this? Are there local stereotypes or discrimination regarding individuals of my background that might be similar to or different from what I’ve experienced in the U.S.?
  • How will I deal with discrimination abroad? Are their resources within the host city/university that I can access? If so, how do I find them?
  • Are there safety considerations that I should be aware of?
Consider the host country’s social and political climate regarding race and ethnicity.
  • What are the cultural and local attitudes towards people of my nationality, race and ethnicity in my host country? What is the attitude of local residents toward people of color?
  • What is the social perception of people of color in my host country? How are people of color socially defined?
  • What roles do people of color have in my host country?
  • What are the racial relations in the host culture?
  • Is the country I am staying in more progressive than my home country regarding issues of race?
  • Are there any conflicts going on within the host country that citizens and visitors of color should be especially aware of? If so, what is the government/police’s role in the conflict?

Financing a Program

If you are intending on enrolling in a DePaul-sponsored program, all of the financial aid and scholarships you currently receive will remain in place. Additionally, there are DePaul-spons​ored scholarships. If you decide to go on a program through an outside service provider or university, you can still receive federal aid but would need to apply for ext​ernal scholarships.

There are two scholarships specifically for students of color participating in DePaul programs including:
Additionally, Michigan State University has compiled an impressive list of external scholarships, which you can find here.

Advisors

If you are interested in studying abroad for a quarter or longer, contact the advis​or in your geographic region of interest. For short-term programs over breaks, visit the website for the program you are interested in for their contact information.

Regardless of the program, any advisor will be happy to meet with you to discuss any uncertainties or answer any questions you may have.

Resources

On-campus: Additional:
  • AllAbroad.us advocates for increased participation and diversity in study abroad. There are sections for students, parents and faculty/staff. It also includes a "Mentor" section with video clips of mentors who have answered questions about studying abroad as well as an extensive listing of scholarship opportunities.
  • DiversityAbroad includes advice, scholarship information, student testimonials and more.
  • PLATO: Project for Learning Abroad, Training & Outreach addresses some of the issues and challenges ethnicity may play in the study abroad experience for underrepresented students and links to additional information, resources and scholarships. This site also includes the top 10 reasons for students from African-American, Hispanic-American, Native American and Asian/Pacific Islander backgrounds to study abroad.
  • Michigan State University provides information for students of color interested in studying abroad as well as a comprehensive list of scholarships available to students of color considering study abroad.
  • Global Scholars offers online modules for study abroad courses—pre-departure, while abroad and return.

Students with Disabilities Abroad

Study Abroad aims to provide equal access for students interested in an international education and information on accessibility. In collaboration with the Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD), Study Abroad has compiled information regarding the selection of programs, questions to ask yourself, and additional resources including on-campus, off-campus and financial. 

If you are considering study abroad, please let Study Abroad and the Center for Students with Disabilities know so that we can help you select and plan for a program that meets your needs.

Selecting a Program

Research your host country and any other countries you may visit! Just as cultures differ, so do the perceptions and disability accommodations from country to country and city to city. The key for any study abroad participant is flexibility while still receiving the support you require. The more you know, the better prepared you will be for the interaction between your disability and the new environment.
 
Consider the host country and university’s access to services/support:
  • What are the physical environments like in my host country? Are there cobblestone streets and sidewalks?
  • What is the general attitude in my host country towards disabilities and people with disabilities? What kinds of resources are available in my host country?
  • Are there any language differences I should be aware of regarding my disability or necessary accommodations?
  • Are there elevators at the university? Are there elevators at residence halls?
  • How are the classes taught? Is it mainly through lecture, readings, independent research, etc.?
  • Is there an office at the university abroad I can reach out to for accommodations to be made regarding exams, class materials, etc.?
  • How are the assignments and grading scales different?
  • What housing options exist?
  • Is transportation available and accessible?
Consider your own needs and what services/support you may require while abroad:
  • Is the program staff, both at home and abroad, aware of my disability so appropriate arrangements can be made in advance?
  • Does the university provide physical and academic accommodations? If so, how do you request or access these?
  • Is there an office or department that I can utilize at the university abroad? If so, how to I contact them?
  • Will I have access to the medications and supplies I currently take or use in my host country?
  • Do I need additional documentation to ensure I can receive the medication, supplies, and services I require?
  • Are there any physicians I could see while abroad? How would I find them?
  • Am I required to provide my own meals and groceries? Is there a cafeteria that I can access?

Financing a Program

If you are intending to enroll in a DePaul-sponsored program, all of the financial aid and scholarships you currently receive will remain in place. Additionally, there are DePaul-sponsored​ scholarships. If you decide to go on a program through an outside service provider or university, you can still receive federal aid but would need to apply to external scholarships.

In addition, check out Mobility International USA’s list of Disability-Relat​ed Scholarships!

Advisors

If you are interested in studying abroad for a quarter or longer, contac​t the advisor in your geographic region of interest. For short-term programs over breaks, visit the website for the program you are interested in for their contact information.

Regardless of the program, any advisor will be happy to meet with you to discuss any uncertainties or answer any questions you may have.

Resources

On-campus: Additional:
  • U.S. Depart​ment of State​ includes summaries of the policies of different nations toward individuals with disabilities as well as helpful travel information.
  • Center for Disease Control (CDC) provides tips and resources for students who travel abroad including recent health notices.
  • Mobility International USA (MIUSA) aspires to empower people with disabilities through international exchange, information, technical assistance and training to ensure the inclusion of people with disabilities in international exchange and development programs.
  • Access Abroad is a collaborative effort at the University of Minnesota and provides country-specific information on disability-related attitudes and legislation, as well as details on accessibility at selected study abroad sites.
  • Global Sch​olars offers online modules for study abroad courses—pre-departure, while abroad and return.

Transfer Students Abroad

Transfer students may face a distinct set of challenges when it comes to studying abroad, but you should not view those challenges as reasons to not go abroad!

Study Abroad has compiled information regarding the selection of programs, questions to ask yourself, and additional resources including on-campus, off-campus and financial.

Selecting a Program

As a transfer student, there are many academic and personal considerations you must make while planning your future study abroad endeavor.

When I should go abroad?
  • Plan to be on campus for at least two quarters before travel for term-long (quarter or longer) programs.
  • You may be able to study abroad on a short-term program (1-3 weeks over a break) right away. Contact the Study Abroad office for details.
  • For transfer students from two-year colleges, plan to study abroad the fall quarter of your senior year.
  • Application deadlines:
    • November 1 (for Spring Break and Spring programs)
    • February 1 (for Summer, Fall, and Academic Year programs)
    • May 1 (for December, Winter, and Winter-Spring programs)
Which courses can I take?
  • Major and minor credit
  • Liberal Studies domain courses
  • Electives
  • Note: Liberal Studies domain and elective credit is always easiest to fulfill on study abroad, so save those courses.
What about DePaul’s residency requirement?
  • Don’t worry!  In DePaul-sponsored study abroad programs, all of your courses count as DePaul credit.  It's as good as being on campus.

Financing a Program

If you are intending on enrolling in a DePaul-sponsored program, all of the financial aid and scholarships you currently receive will remain in place. Additionally, there are DePaul-sp​onsored scholarships. If you decide to go on a program through an outside service provider or university, you can still receive federal aid but would need to apply to exte​rnal scholarships.

Advisors

If you are interested in studying abroad for a quarter or longer, con​tact the advisor in your geographic region of interest. For short-term programs over breaks, visit the website for the program you are interested in for their contact information.

Regardless of the program, any advisor will be happy to meet with you to discuss any uncertainties or answer any questions you may have.

Resources

  • Study Abroad 101 sessio​ns​ are held every day during the academic year in either Lincoln Park or the Loop by our peer advisors. During the presentation, they will detail how to select a program that’s just right for you, the application process, how to finance your program and which advisor would be the best for you to contact.
  • Global Scholars offers online modules for study abroad courses—pre-departure, while abroad and return.